FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

        

Administrative Questions

How much does the county charge to print maps?


See our fee schedulePayments can be made using cash or check. Checks should be made out to “Development Services”. Credit cards are not accepted.

 

Can you recommend a good surveyor?


As government employees, we cannot provide recommendations. Our advice is to use third party services like Google or the Yellow Pages to find a surveyor.

 

Property Boundaries

Can you tell me where my property boundary is?


Determining the actual location of property boundaries is the responsibility of a professional, licensed land surveyor. The county does not perform surveys.

 

My neighbor and I disagree about the location of our common property line. Can I use the Parcel & Zoning Viewer Webmap to prove that I’m right?

 

No, the parcel map is not to be used to prove legal evidence of size, shape, location, ownership, boundary of real property or right of ways. Only a licensed surveyor can do this. In the event of a dispute, a surveyor would be hired, by you, to determine the legal boundary. If your neighbor refuses to acknowledge the survey, the next step would be to consult an attorney. If both parties and their respective surveyors and attorneys do not agree, then ultimately the boundary line may have to be determined in civil court. Please see the State of Utah Property Right Ombudsman website for more information.

 

I remember seeing a survey of a property years ago in the County Surveyor’s office, but it’s not on your Survey Viewer. Is it hiding somewhere?


We have made every effort to include any document from the Surveyor’s office that even looks like a survey in our viewer, and are constantly adding surveys found in other places as well. Unfortunately, many times surveys were done informally as a friendly service and were not properly documented, signed, recorded, or stored. Once a time machine has been invented we will gladly travel back in time and make sure all surveys are properly recorded for posterity’s sake. Until then, we cannot say what happened to a survey that may have been done many years ago.

 

My neighbor had a survey done last year, but it doesn't show up in your viewer—why not?


It is the responsibility of the surveyor, or the person requesting a survey, to submit it to the county to be recorded. Frequently, a survey done to mark out the location of a property is not recorded with our office.

 

Can I use my GPS unit to find my property boundaries?


Common handheld GPS units are limited in accuracy to about 3 meters. If an error of a dozen feet isn’t a big deal, then go right ahead. Otherwise, if you're building a fence and need it to be accurate, contact a licensed professional with the proper equipment. See water.usgs.gov/osw/gps for more info about GPS accuracy.

 

Can you give me GPS coordinates to my property?


First, a disclaimer: The location of features on our map, including objects shown in the aerial imagery, is not guaranteed to be accurate. In the Parcel and Zoning Viewer, click the crosshairs in the very bottom left corner of the map, and then click on the point you want the latitude and longitude for.

 

Property Information

How often is the parcel data updated?


It can take up to 30 days for the parcel boundaries and owner information to be updated following a change. The Recorder's plats are updated using a different method and may take longer to be updated. These plats and the Parcel and Zoning Viewer may also differ slightly.

 

Do you have phone numbers for property owners?


The County only collects property owners' mailing addresses. We do not collect or store phone numbers. The Mailing List Tool in the Parcel and Zoning Viewer can be used to get the mailing addresses for all property owners surrounding a property.

 

How do I read my legal description?


Most legal descriptions follow the pattern of establishing a Point of Beginning (POB) and then tracing the boundary using a series of directions and distances, like North 89 degrees 15 minutes 10 seconds 35 feet. This is usually abbreviated “N 89*15’10” 35.0 ft.” These segments are often separated by “th”, or “thence.” Often times a legal description will have a “Less” or “Also” section, which means add (also) or subtract (less) the described area to/from the initial description. Distances on older properties are often given in rods (rd, 16.5’) and chains (ch, 66’). Descriptions for subdivision lots are listed on the subdivision plat. Additional resources for reading legal descriptions can be found on the internet.

 

Land Development and Roads

Can I split my land?


Depending on the location of your property, (i.e. city or county) you would first need to contact the proper office to determine the regulations that apply to your parcel. (i.e. ordinance, minimum lot size, road frontage, etc...) If it is determined, by the appropriate office, that the property can be divided the Cache County Planning Department, located in Development Services, can assist you in the proper steps to follow.

What does it mean when it says my parcel is "Restricted"?


A parcel in the unincorporated county that has not been properly split or created may be considered restricted from development. Please contact the Planning Department for more information.

 

Is such-and-such an official county road? How wide is it?


The exact determination of road ownership and width can be a long process with few simple answers. Please contact the Planning Department for more information.

 

Are there any easements on my property?


Easements are recorded with the Recorder’s Office; we do not maintain a list or geographic database of any easements. A title company may be able to help you track down any easements.

 

My house just got put into the floodplain.  What, if anything, can I do about this?

 

You can hire a licensed surveyor to do an elevation certificate.  This can then be submitted along with a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA) application to FEMA.  Please see the Floodplain Viewer page and click the FEMA link for more information.

 

Where do our most asked about GIS layers come from . . .?

A good deal of our GIS layers come from other government agencies such as FEMA, U.S. Fish and Wildlife - National Wetlands Inventory, USGS - National Hydrology Dataset, Utah Geological Survey (UGS), Utah Division of Water Quality and the UTAH AGRC...........Click Here for more information.